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Glossary

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Barrier Coat A coating used to isolate a dye, stain, glaze, or topcoat either from the surface to which it is applied or a previous coating for the purpose of increasing adhesion, insuring compatibility, or isolating contamination. Also known as a tie coat.
Base-Color The first color coat applied during many types of faux finishing techniques.
Binder The nonvolatile portion of the vehicle of a coating which holds together the pigment particles and attaches them to the substrate.
Bleaching The fading of a color toward white generally caused by exposure to chemicals or ultraviolet radiation.

The use of one of the three wood bleaches to remove natural color, dyes, or water stains from wood.

Bleeding The diffusion of color matter through a coating from underlying surfaces causing color change. Caused by a common solvency of the topcoat and the dye.
Blistering The formation of blisters in coating films by the local loss of adhesion and lifting of the film from the underlying substrate.
BLO Boiled linseed oil. One of the drying oils used to make conversion coatings like varnish.
Block Resistance The ability of a coating to resist sticking to itself when used on two surfaces that come into contact with each other or other surfaces.
Blocking A coating's tendancy to adhere to itself on another freshly coated surface or to other substrates. Causes windows to bind, doors to stick and damage to finished surfaces when they’re contacted before the coating fully cures.
Blooming Unlike blushing, bloom forms after the coating has dried or cured. Presenting as a haze in the film (may be irridescent or bluish like an oil slick) of coating surfaces, it's caused by the exudation of a component of the coating such as oil plasticizer, uncured oil stain, or noncrosslinked coating constituent when the coated part is exposed to a cycle of heat, humidity, and cooling. Also caused when an acid cured coating (e.g., conversion varnish) is applied over a sealer that contains zinc stearate; the acid and zinc have a chemical reaction as the coating cures (may occur months after application).
Blotch/Blotching Blotches are random areas on the surface of the wood that have adsorbed more of the dye, stain, or finish compared to other areas. The sharp contrast between dark and lighter areas on the wood surface is usually considered unattractive.
Blush Retarder A thinner/reducer with slower drying properties.
Blushing A film defect which manifests itself as a milky appearance which is generally caused by rapid solvent evaporation or the presence of excessive moisture during the curing process. Blushing can be prevented by slowing down the drying/evaporation rate of the solvents in the coating by adding a retarder.
Body Used to describe the consistency or thickness/viscosity of the coating while in liquid form.
Bond The adhesion of, or ability of, two items to stick to one another.
Bonding The attachment between a coating film and the underling material to which it is applied.
Bounce Back The rebound of atomized coating, especially when applied by conventional air spray methods. The air pressure used to atomize the coating bounces off the surface being sprayed keeping the material from attaching to the surface and it's lost as overspray.
Box Coat Spraying the first pass in one direction and the second at a right angle to the first providing more even film distribution.
Boxing Mixing of coatings by pouring from one container to another. When starting a large paint job, it's wise to intermix (box) the containers of paint to ensure they are all the same color and avoid slight variations from one container to another.
Bridging When a finish forms a layer over a crack or void rather than filling it. Often seen as white or gray pores where the finish has bridged the pore rather than fill it.
Brittleness The lack of resistance to cracking or breaking of a coating film when bent or flexed.
Bronzing A coloration (often green) observed on a dyed surface that contrasts with the actual color of the dye. It's caused by a concentration of dye crystals left on the surface of the wood after the carrier evaporated. To fix the problem, wipe the surface with a rag wetted with the proper solvent or simply topcoat with a solvent-based coating.
Brush marks Ridges left after application of the coating by a brush due to poor flow, leveling or substrate wetting. Choosing the proper brush, using good technique, and thinning the coating as needed all work to reduce or eliminate brush marks.
Brushability The ease of applying a coating by brush.
Bubbling A temporary or permanent film defect in which bubbles of air or solvent vapor are present in the applied film. See air entrapment.
Build The wet or dry film thickness of a coating. See high build.
Bumps High and low spots in a coating surface caused by unwanted flowing that occurs during curing. Caused by surface tension gradients that arise during curing.
Burn-in Method of filling a defect in wood using a hot knife and a burn-in stick of resin or shellac.

Also, the ability of a new coat of finish to partially dissolve the surface of the previous coat and attain a chemical bond creating a continuous film instead of multiple layers/coats.

Burnishing The formation of shiny area on a finished surface as a result of rubbing.
Butyl Cellosolve A registered, trademark name for ethylene glycol monobutyl ether. A slow evaporating, water miscible, relatively strong solvent. Commonly used as a lacquer retarder.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


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