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Glossary

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

De-Gloss The removal of the shine on a surface either by sanding or chemical de-glossers. (see scuff sanding)
Deionized Water Water which has been purified to remove mineral salts.
Delamination The separation between layers of coats or substrate due to poor adhesion.
Denatured alcohol Ethyl alcohol with a small percentage of a poison added. Used as a solvent for shellac and some dyes.
Density Mass per unit volume, usually expressed as grams per milliliter or pounds per gallon.
Dew Point The temperature of a surface, at a given ambient temperature and relative humidity, at which condensation of moisture will occur.
DFT Dry film thickness.
Diluent Portion of the volatile components of a coating which is not a true solvent. Has minimal effect on the viscosity and reduces the solids content in applied coating formulations.
Dispersion The suspension of tiny particles, usually pigments, in a liquid, usually resin.
Distilled Water Water which has been purified by vaporizing the liquid and collecting the vapor which is then condensed back to a liquid having, in the process, removed the contaminants.
Distressing Fly speck spotting, sand throughs, dents, scrapes, gouges, cracks, holes, and other age marks in the finished surface or on the substrate.
Drier Chemical agent which promotes oxidation and drying of a coating. Mainly used in oil based coatings, printing inks and varnishes. Driers are usually metallic compositions and are available in both solid and liquid forms. Different groups of driers are available: primary driers (active driers), secondary driers (auxiliary driers), and combination driers.
Dry Fall A coating which is designed to dry rapidly so that the overspray can be easily removed from the surfaces below. The coating is dry by the time it falls to the floor.
Dry Hard The elapsed time at which a coating has reached its optimum hardness. Although finishes like shellac, lacquer, and waterborne don't cure/crosslink, they do retain slvents in the film for long periods and continue to shrink as the solvents slowly evaporate. This slow evaporation and shrinkage is the reason behind the recommendation to wait up to a month before rubbing these finishes to a high gloss. Otherwise, the finish may continue to shrink and the pores in the wood will re-appear in the surface of the finish as dimples.
Dry Spray Formation of a powdery surface while spraying. This is caused by too much fine overspray usually from too high a pressure at atomisation and thinners evaporating too fast between the gun nozzle and the surface. The fine aerosol formed looses its solvent and is deposited in an almost dry form on the surface.
Dry Spray Overspray or bounce back producing a sandy finish due to the sprayed particles having partially dried before reaching the surface.
Dry Time Time allotted for an applied coating film to reach a set stage of cure or hardness.
Dry to Handle The degree of cure at which a film will resist deformation due to handling.
Dry to Recoat The time required for a cured film to dry prior to the application of a second coat without adverse impact.
Dry to Tack Free A stage at which a coating film will form a skin to which dust will not adhere.
Dry to Touch The state of dry at which a coating film will not transfer onto an item touched lightly against it.
Drying Oil An oil having the property of hardening by oxidation to a tough film when exposed to air in the form of a thin film.
Drying time The interval between the application of a coating and when it is ready for service.
Dulling A loss of gloss or sheen.
Durability The degree to which a coating can withstand the destructive effects of the environment to which it is exposed including the ability to withstand scrubbing, abrasion, etc. Not directly related to hardness.
Dust Nibs A surface defect in a dried coating caused by small particles settling on the surface of the finish as it was drying, before a film had formed on the surface. Repaired by sanding level and recoating or rubbing out.
Dye A coloring material that dissolves completely in a system that is very transparent.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


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